Work-Related Stress and Its Effects
Libby Balch
10th Mar

2013

Counseling Helps People Handle Work-Related Stress

Men and women respond in different ways to stress that is caused by their jobs.  A fight or flight reaction is more common in men; “women are more likely to have a ‘tend and befriend’ response, seeking comfort in relationships and care of loved ones, according to research by Shelley E. Taylor, health psychology professor at the University of California, and others”.  Some stress is good and can spur one to higher levels of performance.  However, chronic stress can cause elevated levels of stress hormone such as cortisol and adrenaline.  It reduces ”mental clarity, short-term memory, decision-making and moods”, all of which affect productivity.  “…If harmful levels of stress continue too long, a person may loose the ability to relax, a condition linked in research to  numerous health problems.”  Quotes from the article “Office Stress:  His Versus Hers”, written by Lauren Weber and Sue Shellenbarger, which appeared in the Wall street Journal on Tuesday, March 5, 2013.

I have worked with many individuals over the last few years, who are suffering the effects of work-related stress as companies have reduced staff in order to survive the lengthy recession.  One person’s staff of 18 was reduced to 5, with the same output expected.  Segue Counseling can help you to handle stress in a healthier way.

 

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